Friday, April 19, 2013

Loquats: Here's What You Do with Them

This post has moved to the new Full and Content.

To read the article and get the recipes, go here.

11 comments:

  1. This is PERFECT! Despite being in Texas for the last 5 years I have completely missed the Loquat boat. I love not only the recipe options, but all of the wonderful tips -- perfect for Loquat virgin like myself! :-)

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    1. Glad to hear it! I hope you get to try some soon.

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  2. Here's how I make Loquat Liquor

    1.75 liters of vodka or rum
    Loquats

    Pour all of the vodka or rum in a gallon jar and then fill it up with peeled loquats. I cut out the bloom end to expose the seeds. Let the mixture sit for 2 to 3 months and then strain off the loquats. Mix equal parts of the Liquor with simple syrup, e.g. 1 cup alcohol and 1 cup simple syrup.

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    1. Awesome! Thanks for sharing. I actually have some more loquats I picked from an elderly neighbor's tree so I may try this out.

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  3. Thank you so much!!!! We have a loquat tree and I had no clue what to do with them... nor when to pick them. I am sure the birds and squirrels aren't going to be to happy about me finding your blog! ;) Thanks again!

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    1. You're welcome, and I'm very glad it was helpful. Check back in and let me know how it goes... and share any other ideas you may come up with!

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  4. Great roundup! Quick question: When you blanch them, do you drop them in whole? Or do you have to halve and seed them first? Thanks...

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    1. I drop them in whole, then seed them afterwards... and the fragrance when seeding them is really intensified. It's hard not to eat them up on the spot! Glad you enjoyed the post.

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  5. Thanks for all the yummy ideas to enjoy my loquat trees!

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  6. They do not ship very well.
    I am in Santa Barbara and want to ship some to my sister in Virginia.
    Can anyone help me?
    Thank You

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    1. Yeah, I can't imagine they'd ship well. They bruise easily and once harvested their life span is short (it's longer refrigerated). My best suggestion, and this would be a complete experiment, would be to harvest them when they are JUST yellow, pack them snugly in a plastic container to protect them from being jostled too much, and then overnight them. I have no idea on the rules about shipping fruit state to state but I'd look into it before trying it. Good luck!

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